Since 2013

40
young women

have been trained to run school based literacy clubs in 20 schools.

In 2014

a new guidebook

used by all CODE trained teachers was translated into teachers’ first language (Kiswahili).

In 2013

32 writers, publishers and illustrators

participated in a workshop to develop a series of non-fiction books.

Tanzania is located in Eastern Africa. Though it’s official languages are English and Kiswahili, there are more than 129 different ethnic groups in Tanzania, each with their own language. As a result, many students are taught in a language other than their mother tongue. Studies have shown that learning in mother tongue is best for children to gain literacy skills and learn other subjects in primary school (UNESCO 2008). In Tanzania, students and teachers have limited access to reading books and textbooks, which can exacerbate these challenges. One study found that on average there is one book for every three students in Tanzania (Mlyakado 2012).

Reading Tanzania logoABOUT Reading Tanzania

An adaptation of Reading CODE, Reading Tanzania, is a comprehensive readership initiative that aims to improve the learning outcomes of children and youth in underserved communities. Together with our partner the Children’s Book Project (CBP) we are currently working in 75 schools in collaboration with the various local education offices, school inspectors and Mpwapwa Teacher’s College. 

Through the Reading Tanzania program, a core team of trainers have become qualified to train teachers in effective teaching strategies. Teachers are also being trained in library promotion and management with an aim to encourage children to access books for leisure.

A key objective of the program is to boast the production of high quality books in Kiswahili, the local language spoken in the Kongwa District. The books are used by teachers in their classrooms to enhance children’s learning outcomes as well as cultivating a strong reading culture among them.

 

Country Stats

Capital: Dodoma

Population: 49.253 million

Area: 947,300 km2

GDP (per capita): $128.2 billion

Languages: The official languages in Tanzania are Kiswahili and English, yet more than another 120 local languages are spoken across the country. 

Literacy Rate:  87.3%

Literacy Rate for Women: 87.2%

Literacy Rate for Men: 87.4%

Out-of-school Rate: 18.1% of school-aged children do not attend school

Where We Work: Kongwa District, a rural area in the Dodoma Region

Did you Know?

Only 3.5 % of all grade 6 pupils in Tanzania have sole use of a reading textbook. 

The odds of a child carrying a malaria parasite is 44% lower if their mother has a secondary education.

Recent News and Stories

Celebrating the Winners of the 2015-16 Burt Award for African LiteratureApr 26, 2016The past few months have been busy for CODE’s partners in Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya and Tanzania. They each awarded talented local authors of English language literary works for young adults with CODE’s Burt Award for African Literature. ...read full article...
Volunteer Voices: Charlie TempleApr 14, 2016"I've met so many great people at CODE gatherings who have been able to share their talents and resources in the service of others. Some are retired officials from the Canadian government or UNESCO. Some are business executives....read full article...
Storytelling in teaching and learning for pupilsMar 31, 2016A new guidebook called ‘Mbinu Saba’ was recently launched to address teaching methodology challenges in Tanzania. The guidebook was prepared in collaboration with CODE. Teaching methodologies is one of the critical areas that  ...read full article...
A Tanzanian Success StoryFeb 01, 2016A recent study shows that the Reading CODE project is succeeding in its mission of creating capable young readers and writers in Tanzania. The assessment shows students from project schools outperforming their peers in non-project schools by leaps and......read full article...

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Recent Burt Award Winners

Photos From the Field

Our work takes us around the globe and close to home. We love to share photos of the faces and places where your contributions are making a real difference.